We all enjoy the beauty of trees in fall colors.  What does this season change mean for the land and animals?  What is nature doing?  How would large herbivores such as buffalo respond to the annual leaf drop?  These are the questions to think about when working with nature.

Elderberry leaves seem to be one of our cattle favorites to BROWSE.

Elderberry leaves (bright greenish yellow) seem to be one of our cattle favorites to BROWSE.

Grazer or Browser?

Cattle are primarily grazers, preferring grass over broad leaves.  Sheep will generally eat about half grass and half leaves.  Goats are primarily browsers, meaning they prefer leaves (broadleaf weeds and trees) over grass.  All three are ruminants, they have a special stomach called a rumen.  The rumen is full of bacteria that digests the incoming vegetation.  As vegetation is broken down by bacteria, nutrition is released and made available to the animal.

The broad wide mouth of a cow is obviously designed to grab swaths of forage, such as grasses swaying in the prairie and probably one main reason cattle prefer to graze.  Since the main incoming vegetation is grass, the bacteria that best thrive on grass will be dominant in a cow rumen.  It is best to feed the dominant bacteria population in their rumen what they want, and not sending down something the bacteria is not used to, resulting in an upset tummy.

Grazing the annual leaf drop in a section of forest/stream that was last grazed the summer of 2016.

Grazing the annual leaf drop in a section of forest/stream that was last grazed the summer of 2016.

Grazing Leaves?

If a leaf drops on the ground before it is eaten, is that considered Grazing or Browsing?

Cattle aren’t much for climbing trees!  Goats are known to climb somewhat (warning don’t park your car where a goat can climb it).  The cattle herd will browse the lower branches of trees creating a “browse line”.  This time of year the leaves come to the cows!

So why eat leaves if you are a grazer?

  • Tannins
    • These somewhat toxic compounds, mainly found in tree leaves, can actually help animals balance digestive problems.
  • Nutrients
    • Leaves contain different nutrients than grasses.
  • Other
    • Reasons the cattle only know.

You will find warnings to not let cattle have access to this tree leaf or that weed leaf.  These warnings imply cattle are dumb?  Luckily we have smart cattle.  As long as the herd has adequate foraging opportunities, we do not worry about poisonous plants.

  • Our Momma cows teach their calves.
  • If someone gets an upset stomach from something, lesson learned!

We do avoid poison hemlock patches during the winter when hemlock leaves are green and everything else is pretty much brown.

Annual leaf drop in forested stream area. The herd is excluded from this section of stream that was grazed earlier this summer.

Annual leaf drop in forested stream area. The herd is fenced out from this section of stream grazed earlier this summer.

Annual Leaf Drop

With just a little planning we can MOVE the herd for the opportunity to take advantage of the leaf drop.  We let them choose how many and what leaves to graze.  Other things to consider during this graze:

  • Stream channel stability
  • Water quality
  • Wildlife needs

When leaves fall in the stream and dissolve, carbon dioxide is released.  Carbon dioxide plus water creates carbonic acid.  This weak acid breaks down rocks/minerals.  The changed mineral content of the water cycles new minerals through plants and animals.  The break down of rocks is also part of soil formation.

It is easy to see and understand the process described in the photo of the stream and leaves shown above.  But this is the exact same process the cattle herd encourages in our prairie!  When cattle stomp and manure a pasture, the dead grasses release carbon dioxide and moisture in the soil or from rain creates carbonic acid in the prairie soil creating more soil!  What a wonderful design.  Remember the bacteria described in the rumen of the cow?  The exact same process is also going on under our feet in the soil!  SOIL is one huge RUMEN full of all kinds of microbes.  Do you think it is an accident that these processes have a similar design repeated throughout nature?

Grazing and managing cattle in natures image results in:

  • SOIL CATTLE!

    • Nourished by the soil

    • Creating new healthy soil

    • Feeding healthy people

  • Not OIL Cattle!

    • Dependent on fossil fuels (OIL) for:

      • Fertilizer and pesticides

      • Machine planting, harvesting and hauling

Please contact us if you would like to visit the herd of SOIL CATTLE always on the Mooooove.

Our previous post covered how we deal with bugs that bother our herd on the inside.  Everyone is probably more familiar with those pesky bugs that bother our cows on the outside.  Yes, cows come with a fly swatter on their hind end, but here we list a few management practices that help our herd put up with these pesky bugs.

Compare the fly pressure between these two cows! Quite a difference wouldn't you agree?

Compare the fly pressure between these two cows! Quite a difference, do you agree?

Did you know some cows attract more flies?

Apparently the level of testosterone within an animal makes a difference in attracting flies.  Usually bulls will attract more flies than cows.  So if we have a cow attracting a larger number of flies, that is a red flag.  The cow shown in the photo with higher fly pressure is on our list to be culled.

Many cattle owners don’t know there is a difference in fly pressure between cows.  The use of insecticide feed, ear tags and pour-on products prevent their cows from displaying fly pressure.  If this last sentence is confusing to you, many farms use chemical fly control in the following ways:

  • Cows are actually fed larvicide and insect growth regulators!  Yuck!
  • Ear tags contain insecticides.
  • Insecticides are actually “poured onto” the back of cows.

Remember, pests are natures way of eliminating the weak.  The use insecticide products on cattle across our land accomplishes two things:

  1. Allows poor (weak) cattle to stay in the herd.
  2. Creates super flies that are resistant to chemicals.

Super Files

Since we mimic natures management with our cattle herd, we are not worried about the super flies being created by the use of insecticides on other herds.  No chemical insecticides used on our herd.  Fly management starts with manure management, flies lay their eggs in cow pies.  Our fly management includes:

  • MOVE!
    • It takes a few days for fly eggs to hatch and mature.
    • We keep the herd in front of the flies the best we can.
  • Pasture Diversity!
    • There are all kinds of critters that feed on flies and their larvae.
    • Dung beetles, birds and other creepy crawly things in the soil are encouraged.
    • Unfortunately, those using poisons are reducing natural predators in the process.
  • Stock Density.
    • With tight herd moves cattle will smear their recent manure pats before moving to fresh pasture.
    • Smeared cow pies = destroying the habitat for fly larvae.
  • Minerals.
    • Sulfur seems to be a key mineral for repelling all kinds of pests.
    • Pests avoid healthy animals, they are searching for the weak.
    • Minerals keep our cattle immune system working properly.
  • Natural “organic” repellents.
    • Until we can get the animal culled from our herd we have had good luck with “Eco-Phyte” from AGRI-DYNAMICS.
      • Contains essential oils such as lemongrass and eucalyptus.
      • There are other organic products to consider.
    • These type of products are becoming more available as alternatives to Deet based products for humans now days!

Recommended Reading

For more on flies and herd health we recommend you search the following sources:

We are not talking about that fly in your house!  What about those bugs that live inside our cattle?

Prior to becoming Animal Welfare Approved, we didn’t think much about the bugs inside our cows.  We had heard about using a microscope to check for “worm eggs” in cow manure but as much as Doug likes looking at cow pies, this seemed a little bit odd.  Actually, we just didn’t know how to go about it.  Annual testing for internal parasites is a requirement of the Animal Welfare Approved process.

Brown stomach worm life cycle, image source: Beef Cattle Research Council (http://www.beefresearch.ca/).

Brown stomach worm life cycle, image source: Beef Cattle Research Council (http://www.beefresearch.ca/).

During our first Animal Welfare certification process, the inspector told us to just take a manure sample to a veterinarian.  How simple!  Fifteen dollars later we had a worm egg count.  With our animals on pasture all the time, we figured we were good.  The June 2016 report actually told us that at our egg count number of 1200 per gram was bad, we were losing production!

A toxic wormer was not an option for our herd.  Doug reviewed notes from previous training.  The solution we used this past year was a non toxic supplementation approach:

  • Apple Cider Vinegar
  • Diatomaceous Earth
  • Salt

We created a mix of equal parts of the above three items and fed it to the herd in a tub.  In addition, during the fall and early spring we added Cina homeopathic remedy to their water.

Results

The June 2017 egg count report came back at 200 eggs per gram.  The veterinarian told us to keep doing what we were doing as this is a very good – low egg count.

Is a non-toxic supplementation program a solution?

We are happy with our results from last years efforts, but it did take effort.

  • What if we managed grazing heights better?
  • What if we moved more often?

We believe we can lower worm eggs with just better grazing management.  Look again at the image above.  Apparently the larvae can only climb the vegetation so high.

  • Keeping grazing heights higher should reduce larvae ingestion.

As for more often moves.  In a recent Stockman Grass Farmer article, grazier Greg Judy does an excellent job explaining how he has reduced herd health issues with more frequent moves!

Our goal at DS Family Farm is to give a fresh section of pasture to the herd every day.  This past year we have implemented providing TWO moves to fresh pasture during a day on occasion.  We understand that even more moves (4 or more per day) would benefit both the animals and the grass even further.  Think of the roaming herds of buffalo with moves when they wanted.

Balance and How

It all comes back to balance.  There are only so many hours in a day.  We always remember our WHY we do what we do.  We provide clean meat for peace of mind.

  • HOW we produce clean meat is always a work in progress.

Feel free to join us on our journey of how we continue to improve our management in our attempts to mimic nature.

 Email us or give us a call if you would like to visit our in MOOOTION herd, the herd on the move.

Raising Pasture Grazed grassfed beef from conception to table is not an easy task.  We may have four different animal classes in our herd at any one time.  But it all starts with the COW, the factory on our farm!

Cow Factory

THE COW FACTORY – here she is milking this year’s calf (far left) while grooming her calf from two years ago. Her two-year old calf on the right will be harvested this fall.

We make our cows work, they must:

  1. Conceive and raise a calf each year
  2. Raise that calf providing milk for 8+ months
    1. Refer to Weaning Weight Post 2015
    2. Weaning at an older age fully develops the calf’s rumen for grass based production.
  3. While milking a calf for 8+ months, she is developing her next calf inside her.
  4. While milking this years calf, she will watch over her previous two calves in a low stress herd environment.
  5. Graze our pastures in nature’s pattern to improve our pastures soil and grasses!

WOW!

We ask a lot from our cows, but they love their job from what we can tell.  They are definitely a factory when you look at all they crank out.  The cows do all the above listed items and all we give them are:

If a cow cannot do all five functions listed above (calf every year while grazing every day) she is removed from the herd.  No slackers allowed.  There are very few cows that can do what we ask of our girls.  We are just trying to mimic how nature works here in our small pastures.  There is a movement underway across this country with more folks farming in natures image.  This movement is called Regenerative Agriculture.  We are not just “sustaining” our natural resources but IMPROVING our soils and grass while creating product!  If you would like to support the Regenerative Agriculture movement,  seek out products from these growers.  Will these products be higher priced?  Most likely yes.  For the higher price you will get a better quality product and your health will thank you for it.

Let’s just say it takes an amazing Factory to deliver a product while at the same time improving its environment to repeat the cycle in the future.  Take another look at what is happening in the photo.  This photo is a great way to display why we are “Animal Welfare Approved” and “Grassfed Certified”.  Farming in nature’s image, trying to work within God’s design (without messing it up too much).

Cow Factory

DS Family Farm – raising beef using God’s design.  Letting Cows be Cows!  The steer on the right will be harvested this fall after living two plus years in the same herd with its mother.  Always on pasture, never confined to a lot, never fed corn or other grains.  Come see and taste the difference.

We continue to learn and adapt to raising beef in nature’s image.  Our Animal Welfare Approved and Certified Grassfed beef are not pampered.  These steers were never separated from the rest of the herd and fed a high energy diet to lay on fat.  The fat that these animals do carry should have an Omega 6 to 3 ratio below 2:1.  We will again test following harvest to verify quality as we have done the past two years (check our “About” page for details).

We have been blessed with another year in this endeavor.  We thank our customers for their continued interest in what we are trying to do.  We thank the Lord (Father, Son and Holy Spirit) for the gifts he has entrusted us with.